Friday, March 22, 2013

Coral reefs are not adapted to survive long term stress. For example, agricultural and industrial runoff, invasive species, increased sedimentation from land clearing, human sewage, and toxic discharges can all be stressful. Also, land based activities such as farming can introduce herbicides and pesticides. Their are many solutions to protect the coral reefs, together we can make a difference.

Invasive Alien Algae Removal

March 21, 2013 many students from different high schools gathered at Maunalua Bay to help remove invasive algae that was a threat to the coral reefs. As a result, the students gave back to the bay by participating in the project to save the coral reefs. I hope our hard work inspires other people to make a difference as well.

Thursday, March 21, 2013

Gardening is a fantastic way to save money, and better yet plastic and other materials that are bad for the environment!!

Off-roading in the mud does more damage than we realize. The muddy water goes into the ocean and the coral reefs cannot handle it.

Remember to ALWAYS recycle your aluminum, plastic, and glass bottles.

Remember to ALWAYS recycle your aluminum, plastic, and glass bottles.

Many organisms cannot tell the difference between trash and food. For example, albatross eats anything that is floating on the ocean surface.

Don’t turn organisms homes into a trash can. Save them by using actual bins meant for trash. This sinkhole was once a home for a certain species of shrimp, but not anymore.

Get the community together for a beach clean up. Think of all the trash we’re keeping from going into the ocean, furthermore, we are saving many marine organisms.

Monday, March 18, 2013
blogworldpeace:

(via Long-lasting Chemicals May Harm Sea Turtles: Scientific American)
From the moment they are born, sea turtles fight to survive. Buried alive, they dig themselves out and evade hungry crabs and birds as they crawl to the ocean, where they begin a long and treacherous migration. One out of 1,000 will survive into adulthood. And those that do will bear a toxic burden.

blogworldpeace:

(via Long-lasting Chemicals May Harm Sea Turtles: Scientific American)

From the moment they are born, sea turtles fight to survive. Buried alive, they dig themselves out and evade hungry crabs and birds as they crawl to the ocean, where they begin a long and treacherous migration. One out of 1,000 will survive into adulthood. And those that do will bear a toxic burden.

ecozoic:

10 Marine Species on the Brink of Mass Extinction Due to Ocean Acidification
7. Sea Urchin

ecozoic:

10 Marine Species on the Brink of Mass Extinction Due to Ocean Acidification

7. Sea Urchin

marine-science:

marine-science:

On a commercial street in China, little tortoises are found packaged as souvenir!!! These little tortoises are still alive and swimming inside a herbal solution. The store owner says it can live for 1-3 months. 5 RMB a piece.
This is cruel and unacceptable. Who knows how many little lives were slowly suffocated to silent death; their fate sealed in a bag.Has the commercial world no more other ideas to make money!!!

marine-science:

On a commercial street in China, little tortoises are found packaged as souvenir!!! These little tortoises are still alive and swimming inside a herbal solution. The store owner says it can live for 1-3 months. 5 RMB a piece.


This is cruel and unacceptable. Who knows how many little lives were slowly suffocated to silent death; their fate sealed in a bag.

Has the commercial world no more other ideas to make money!!!

320gr:

Prisoners of Lab

Many marine species can’t be photographed underwater for a variety of different reasons. Some animals are too small, some spend their life burrowed in the seafloor, and some live in the dark depths where nobody can dive. At our station, we collect specimens using different methods and as a result are able to show a wide range of animals, which we haven’t previously seen in their natural environment. You can view them in this gallery, which also contains photos of some more common, yet very beautiful White Sea inhabitants that I love.

alxndrasplace:

(National Geographic via My Shot)  Marine Species Under Threat
Sea Otters
A couple of charismatic sea otters, mother and child, share a meal of crab caught at Point Lobos State Reserve on California’s central coast. These animals do nearly everything in the water, including giving birth and sleeping. Fur hunters once pushed sea otters to the brink of extinction and a century ago only 1,000 to 2,000 individuals remained. Today the otters are protected, and their numbers have swelled to perhaps 150,000.

alxndrasplace:

(National Geographic via My Shot)  Marine Species Under Threat

Sea Otters

A couple of charismatic sea otters, mother and child, share a meal of crab caught at Point Lobos State Reserve on California’s central coast. These animals do nearly everything in the water, including giving birth and sleeping. Fur hunters once pushed sea otters to the brink of extinction and a century ago only 1,000 to 2,000 individuals remained. Today the otters are protected, and their numbers have swelled to perhaps 150,000.